Blog

The Spontaneous Purchase of Unnecessary Things

Posted by on Jul 29, 2014 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

I am unreasonably captive to my addiction to excessive comfort, exotic travel, expensive meals, beautiful views, and the spontaneous purchase of unnecessary objects. I also own more sneakers, t-shirts, ties, books, watches and socks than I’ll ever be able to use. How much time and energy do I exert to finance this addiction? Through my past obsession with work, 60, 80, 100 hours a week, working in a way that caused me to miss most sunsets and too many school plays, I achieved the reasonable wealth required to purchase too many unnecessary...

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The Voice of Small Business is Ringing True

Posted by on Jul 24, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

There is still one thing both sides of the aisle agree on: Small businesses are great for the economy. After all, there are 23 million small businesses in the U.S., accounting for more than half of all American jobs and sales, according to the Small Business Administration. Without them, the economy would be more vulnerable and far less diverse. And both political parties like to trumpet how much they support these job creators.   So how can we make sure we’re doing the right things to support these companies? The answer’s simple: Ask...

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5 Reasons Why Transformational Change Is Not Possible For Multi-National Corporations?

Posted by on Jul 22, 2014 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

For over twenty years, I have been one of those “consultants,” yet never as a full-time occupation, and often on a voluntary or unpaid basis. Being unpaid actually has some amazing advantages when it comes to speaking honestly.   I have worked with many Fortune 500 companies as well as with dozens of start-ups and I’ve come to the conclusion that transformational change is not possible for multi-national corporations. Even radical change isn’t possible, unless they find themselves with a new CEO who’s hell-bent and...

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Unexpected Community

Posted by on Jul 18, 2014 in Uncategorized | 3 comments

  Most of us live starved for a sense of community that we seem to be unable or unwilling to create in our busy, self-centered lives. A strong sense of family is more than most Americans can hope for. While some of us find community at work, through religion, sports or professional organizations, as David Putnam so sadly documented in “Bowling Alone,” community participation has largely gone the way of the rotary phone. Most of us live with a pervasive sense of community aloneness. Covertly or overtly, the majority of Americans are...

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America and the Environment: Six trends that define what we’re thinking

Posted by on Jul 16, 2014 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

Every year, Joel Mackower of GreenBiz performs a truly important and valuable public service by summarizing most of the past years research on how we feel and think about the environment. It’s easy for those of us who passionately follow the issues to lose touch with mainstream America’s point of view. Though it has to be said, in a time where our politicians don’t pay much attention to the public’s point of view, it probably matters less that we wish that it did.   While the year has been filled with extreme weather events and an...

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Democracy is alive and well in Vermont

Posted by on Jul 2, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Our elected officials stand guard over the gradual decay and dysfunction of the infrastructure upon which our democracy once depended. We exist in a Democracy that is no longer a democracy. It has sold its soul to the highest bidder. Politicians blatantly ignore the will of the few people that elected them. Fists full of dollars, millions of them, cause the governance of the country to grind to a halt. We bemoan the inability of our government to do what is best for the people it represents.   Yet, democracy is alive and well in Vermont....

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Sacred Economics Part 3: The Roadmap to a Sacred Economics

Posted by on Jun 24, 2014 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

So what are Eisenstein’s proposals to take us from the economy of separation to the Sacred Economy of beauty and connectedness? Each gets its own detailed chapter, but they are helpfully summarized in the middle of the book (pp 332-346). Nick Rose reviewing Sacred Economics in On Line Opinion succinctly edited Eisenstein’s proposals.   1. Negative-interest currency: Proceeding from the recognition that the social institution of ‘Money as Debt‘ has resulted, amongst other things, in the enrichment of the...

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Sacred Economics: An Interview with Eisenstein: Part 2

Posted by on Jun 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Writer Jonathan Talat Phillips interviewed Eisenstein back in 2012 about the ritualistic origins of money, the spirit of the gift, negative interest banking and the alchemical art of making economics sacred. What follows are excerpts of the interview.   Can economics really be sacred or is money inherently profane?   Obviously, if anything is sacred today, it certainly isn’t money. Ask yourself, is money a positive or negative influence in politics? In preserving the rainforests? In protecting the indigenous? Is it an ally or...

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Sacred Economics Part 1

Posted by on Jun 4, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Sacred Economics is a hugely ambitious book. It takes aim at the most basic intellectual and moral foundations of our modern industrial societies. Eisenstein, is fully aware that many of his arguments and proposals will seem naïve, utopian and hopelessly idealistic to skeptical readers, versed in the realities of current-day economic theory and practice. However, as he puts it, these ideas only ‘await a deepening of the crisis for the unthinkable to become common sense.   Nick Rose reviewed Sacred Economics in On Line...

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The First World Trends Forum, Riga, Latvia Held April 10 & 11, 2014

Posted by on May 28, 2014 in travel, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Honestly, if you asked me to find Latvia on a map, name its capital, answer whether it was or was not part of the EU – I’d have had no idea. Latvia is a Baltic country, bordered by Lithuania, Belarus, Russia and Estonia. Norway and Sweden are just across the Baltic Sea, but it is a entirely different cultural and political universe.     Latvia is a country struggling to define its identity. Wikipedia notes that at the end of  “World War I, after two years of struggle in the Russian Civil War, Latvia finally won independence...

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